I then went to the Parade. I saw the King. It was a glorious sight.... As a loadstone moves needles, or a storm bows the lofty oak s, did Frederick the Great make the Prussian officers submissive bend as he walked majestic in the midst of them.

James Boswell glory military the heroes heroines

Quotes you may love

I argued that the chastity of women was of much more consequence than that of men, as the property and rights of families depend u pon it.

James Boswell chastity property family

Here now do I find myself in the very sphere of magnificence. I live with princes, and a court is my home.

James Boswell royalty glory home

I went to my father's at night. He spoke of poor John [Boswell's brother] with disgust. I was shocked and said, "He's your son, an d God made him." He answered very harshly, "If my sons are idiots, can I help it?"

James Boswell sons fathers fools and follies

At last, on Monday the 16th of May, when I was sitting in Mr. Davies's back-parlour, after having drunk tea with him and Mrs. Davi es, Johnson unexpectedly came into the shop; and Mr. Davies having perceived him through the glass-door in the room in which we were sitting, advancing towards us,--he announced his aweful approach to me, somewhat in the manner of an actor in the part of Horatio, when he addresses Hamlet on the appearance of his father's ghost, "Look, my Lord, it comes" ... Mr. Davies mentioned my name, and respectfully introduced me to him. I was much agitated; and recollecting his prejudice against the Scotch, of which I had heard much, I said to Davies, "Don't tell where I come from."M"From Scotland," cried Davies roguishly. "Mr. Johnson, (said I) I do indeed come from Scotland, but I cannot help it." I am willing to flatter myself that I meant this as light pleasantry to sooth and conciliate him, and not as an humiliating abasement at the expense of my country.... [W]ith that quickness of wit for which he was so remarkable, he seized the expression "come from Scotland," which I used in the sense of being of that country, and, as if I had said that I had come away from it, or left it, retorted, "That, Sir, I find, is what a very great many of your countrymen cannot help."

James Boswell wit heroes heroines prejudice

The cheering sound of "Dinner is upon the table," dissolved his reverie.... Mr. Wilkes placed himself next to Dr. Johnson, and beh aved to him with so much attention and politeness, that he gained upon him insensibly.... Mr. Wilkes was very assiduous in helping him to some fine veal. "Pray give me leave, Sir:MIt is better here--A little of the brown--Some fat, Sir--A little of the stuffing--Some gravy--Let me have the pleasure of giving you some butter--Allow me to recommend a squeeze of this orange;Mor the lemon, perhaps, may have more zest."

James Boswell flattery eating cheerfulness