... whatever men do or know or experience can make sense only to the extent that it can be spoken about. There may be truths beyon d speech, and they may be of great relevance to man in the singular, that is, to man in so far as he is not a political being, whatever else he may be. Men in the plural, that is, men in so far as they live and move and act in this world, can experience meaningfulness only because they can talk with and make sense to each other and to themselves.

Hannah Arendt language community truth

Quotes you may love

Poetry, whose material is language, is perhaps the most human and least worldly of the arts, the one in which the end product rema ins closest to the thought that inspired it.... Of all things of thought, poetry is the closest to thought, and a poem is less a thing than any other work of art ...

Hannah Arendt poetry poets thinking thoughtful language

Poets ... are the only people to whom love is not only a crucial, but an indispensable experience, which entitles them to mistake it for a universal one.

Hannah Arendt poetry poets

... the will always wills to do something and thus implicitly holds in contempt sheer thinking, whose whole activity depends on "d oing nothing."

Hannah Arendt action thinking thoughtful will

Our Last Will and Testament, providing for the only future of which we can be reasonably certain, namely our own death, shows that the Will's need to will is no less strong than Reason's need to think; in both instances the mind transcends its own natural limitations, either by asking unanswerable questions or by projecting itself into a future which, for the willing subject, will never be.

Hannah Arendt death will thinking thoughtful

The discussion of the whole problem of technology ... has been strangely led astray through an all-too-exclusive concentration upo n the service or disservice the machines render to men. The assumption here is that every tool and implement is primarily designed to make human life easier and human labor less painful.... But ... homo faber, the toolmaker, invented tools and equipment in order to erect a world, not ... to help the human life process. The question therefore is not so much whether we are the masters or the slaves of our machines, but whether machines still serve the world and its things, or if, on the contrary, they and the automatic motion of their processes have begun to rule and even destroy world and things.

Hannah Arendt technology destruction